Past Exhibits



  • TONY VACCARO AT 98

    At the age of 21, Tony was drafted into WWII and for the next 272 days he photographed his personal witness to the brutality of war. Tony’s transition from war and its aftermath was a deliberate one. As an antidote to man’s inhumanity, Tony focused his lens on those who gave of themselves: artists, writers, movie stars, and the beauty of fashion 

    By focusing on the splendor of life Tony replaced the images of horror imbedded in his eyes. This exhibition illustrates his will to live and to advance the power of beauty in this life. On December 20, Tony Vaccaro celebrates his 98th birthday, an inspiration to us all.

  • The Campaign

    This year the Presidential race may be largely covered in a virtual reality as the Covid-19 pandemic is affecting every aspect of our daily lives and traditional campaigning will not be possible. The pictures made by these photographers during past Presidential campaigns explore the human dimension of the process by which Americans choose their president.

  • Life on Earth

    “Life on Earth” is a survey of 20th and 21st Century environmental and climate issues documented by photojournalists. Our world is changing faster – and in more ways – than we could have ever imagined. With social and economic disruption on a scale rarely seen since the end of World War II 75 years ago, the Covid-19 pandemic is also forcing us to completely rethink the notion of ‘business as usual’. Using photography, the exhibit informs in the hope the images motivate awareness and change.

  • LIFE: Defining Photography

    A photo-journalistic triumph, LIFE was a stunning affirmation of the humanist notion that the camera’s proper function is to persuade and inform. During the magazine’s golden years its photographers were the elite of their craft and enjoyed worldwide esteem. Published weekly from 1936 to 1972, the work of the photographers of LIFE magazine came to define the medium of photojournalism, and their photographs recorded history and informed us all for most of the 20th Century.

  • Paris Photo New York presented by AIPAD

    The Paris Photo New York Fair presented by the Association of International Photography Art Dealers (AIPAD) was scheduled for April 2-5, 2020 at Pier 94 in New York. Here we present our exhibits intended for the Fair that embody the universal understanding and importance of photojournalism: independent photojournalists covering 21st-century events with a focus on environmental and climate issues including Anna Boyiazis’ series “Finding Freedom in the Water, which was a 2019 Prix Pictet Nominee and received a 2018 World Press Photo Award; Tony Vaccaro, now 97, who was scheduled to be in attendance in Monroe Gallery’s booth; and Ida Wyman (1926–2019), whose work for Life, Look, and other magazines went unrecognized for decades.

  • Life With A Camera

    Ida Wyman was one of the defining artists of early street photography that helped shape how we look at our world. Wyman’s photographic vignettes of life in urban centers and small towns in the United States, taken during the mid-twentieth century, illuminate the historical moment while providing a deeply humanist perspective on her subjects.

    The daughter of Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe, Ida Wyman was born March 7, 1926 in Malden, Massachusetts. The family soon moved to New York, where her parents ran a small grocery store in the Bronx. Her parents bought her a box camera when she was 14, and she joined the camera club at Walton High School, honing her skills at taking and printing pictures. By the time Wyman was 16, she know that she wanted to work as a photographer. Opportunities then were few for women photographers, but in 1943 Wyman joined Acme Newspictures as a mail room ‘boy’; pulling prints and captioning them for clients. At lunch hour, she photographed nearby laborers and office workers with her Graflex Speed Graphic camera.

     

  • La Dolce Vita

    Tony Vaccaro photographed on the set of “La Dolce Vita”, and nearing age 97, he indeed is living “the good life”. At the age of 21, Tony was drafted into the war, and June of 1944, now a combat infantryman in the 83rd Infantry Division, he was on a boat heading toward Omaha Beach, six days after the first landings at Normandy. Denied access to the Signal Corps, Tony was determined to photograph the war, and had his portable 35mm Argus C-3 with him from the start. For the next 272 days, Tony fought on the front lines of the war.

    After the war, Tony remained in Germany to photograph the rebuilding of the country for Stars And Stripes magazine. Returning to the US in 1950, Tony started his career as a commercial photographer, eventually working for virtually every major publication: Look, Life, Harper’s Bazaar, Town and Country, Newsweek, and many more. Tony went on to become one the most sought after photographers of his day, photographing everyone from President John F. Kennedy and Sophia Loren to Pablo Picasso and Georgia O’Keeffe. “La Dolce Vita” is a major new exhibition of more than 40 photographs by Tony Vaccaro that includes several new discoveries from his archive being exhibited for the very first time.

  • Day to Night

    Santa Fe--Monroe Gallery of Photography, 112 Don Gaspar, is pleased to announce an exhibition of Stephen Wilkes’ epic global photographic project Day To Night. The exhibit opens with a public reception for Stephen Wilkes on Friday, October 4, from 5 - 7 pm. Stephen will be signing copies of his new Day To Night monograph, a beautiful oversize hardcover art book with two fold-outs and 260 pages. The exhibition continues through November 24.

    Day to Night is an ongoing global photographic project that began in 2009. Working from a fixed camera angle, Wilkes captures the fleeting moments of humanity and light as time passes. After 24 hours of photographing and over 1500 images taken, he selects the best moments of the day and night. Using time as a guide, all of these moments are seamlessly blended into a single photograph in post-production, visualizing places that are part of our collective memory and unveils a new way of seeing some of the world’s most iconic locations. Wilkes sees the camera not only as a device used to capture images, but also as an instrument to collect information. "Anything one can imagine one can create. Over the last several years, photographic technology has evolved to a point where anything is possible. I imagined changing time in a single photograph. I began to explore this fascination with time in a new series of photographs called: “Day to Night”. –Stephen Wilkes

  • Living in History

    An important exhibition of photographs covering 21st Century events documented by the new-wave of frontline photojournalists, July 5 – September 22, 2019. Although the glory days of publishing history-making events in LIFE magazine are long gone, there is a new generation of photojournalists dedicated to recording history as we live it. Looking at the pictorial documentation of such extraordinary events we often get the impression that we are feeling the pulse of history more intensively than at other times. Remarkably, at the same time the press is under attack as never before in history. Reporters Sans Frontières, or Reporters Without Borders, dropped the U.S. to No. 48 out of 180 on its 2019 annual World Press Freedom Index, three notches lower than its place last year. The move downgrades the country from a "satisfactory" place to work freely to a "problematic" one for journalists.

  • Bob Gomel

    Bob Gomel was born in New York City in 1933 and honed his photography at NY University. After 4 years with the US Navy during the Korean War, he was offered a photo job with the Associated Press, but turned it down and waited a full year before joining LIFE magazine. In addition to LIFE, his photographs have appeared on the covers of Sports Illustrated, Newsweek, Fortune, and Forbes, and in TIME, the New York Times, and Der Stern, and in more than 40 books.

  • History in Pictures

    “History In Pictures” is a gripping selection of images that brings home the power of visual storytelling. These unforgettable images are imbedded in our collective consciousness; they form a sort of shared visual heritage for the human race, a treasury of significant memories. Many of the photographs featured in this exhibition not only moved the public at the time of their publication, and continue to have an impact today, but set social and political changes in motion. Several of the photographs in the exhibition are consistently referred to as among the most influential photographs in history; they shaped the way we think, changed the way we live, and some were turning points in our human experience.

    Looking at the pictorial documentation of such extraordinary events we often get the impression that we are feeling the pulse of history more intensively than at other times. Although often not beautiful, or easy, they are images that shake and disquiet us; and are etched in our memories forever.

  • Tony Vaccaro

    Santa Fe, NM -- Monroe Gallery of Photography is honored to present “Tony Vaccaro: Renaissance” Friday, November 23 through January 27, 2019.

    2018 was a renaissance year for Tony Vaccaro, with recent exhibits in New York, London, Italy, and Pottsdam, Germany; culminating with this major exhibition at Monroe Gallery in Santa Fe that celebrates his 96th birthday on December 20. At the age of 21, Tony was drafted into the war, and by the spring of 1944 he was photographing war games in Wales. By June, now a combat infantryman in the 83rd Infantry Division, he was on a boat heading toward Omaha Beach, six days after the first landings at Normandy. Denied access to the Signal Corps, Tony was determined to photograph the war, and had his portable 35mm Argus C-3 with him from the start. For the next 272 days, Tony fought on the front lines of the war. He entered Germany in December 1944, a private in the Intelligence Platoon, tasked with going behind enemy lines at night. After the war, Tony remained in Germany to photograph the rebuilding of the country for Stars And Stripes magazine. Returning to the US in 1950, Tony started his career as a commercial photographer, eventually working for virtually every major publication: Look, Life, Harper’s Bazaar, Town and Country, Newsweek, and many more. Tony went on to become one the most sought after photographers of his day.

  • Stephen Wilkes

    A timely exhibition celebrating the 20th anniversary of Stephen Wilkes documentary project. Twelve million people passed through Ellis Island from 1892 until its closing in 1954, and tens of millions of Americans today are descendants of immigrants who were thought deplorable by those already here. With the the future of immigration and refuge in America in contention, Wilkes takes us on an unforgettable journey through our collective past that reminds us how we became the diverse nation that we are today and asks us to reflect on our own humanity. Wilkes's powerful images of the underbelly of the island—a purgatory between freedom and captivity—ask us to reflect on the defining experiences of millions.

  • Bill Eppridge

    Bill Eppridge (1938–2013) was one of the most accomplished photojournalists of the Twentieth Century and captured some of the most significant moments in American history: he covered wars, political campaigns, heroin addiction, the arrival of the Beatles in the United States, Vietnam, Woodstock, the summer and winter Olympics, and perhaps the most dramatic moment of his career - the assassination of Senator Robert Kennedy in Los Angeles. Over the last 60 years, his work appeared in numerous publications, including National Geographic, Life, and Sports Illustrated.

    He was the recipient of the 2011 Lucie Award for Achievement in Photojournalism. According to Aurichio, “the most important element to Eppridge was always content but composition helped communicate the content. His own writings on the subject that he titled, “Journalist as artist”, express his philosophy: “A journalist does not necessarily imply ‘artist’ but you are not going to make your point if you cannot make a picture that people will stop and explore...the ‘artist’ in one instant must establish a sense of time, a sense of place, a moment of importance, a moment of aesthetic beauty all in the same frame, one moment in history. In terms of importance, the fewer of these present, the less significant the photograph. Anybody can take pictures, but not anybody can become a photographer.’”

  • LIFE in Pictures

    Founded by Henry Luce, publisher of Time, it was long one of the most popular and widely imitated of American magazines, selling more than 13.5 million copies a week at one point. From its start, Life emphasized photography, with gripping, superbly chosen news photographs, amplified by photo features and photo-essays on an international range of topics. Its photographers were the elite of their craft and enjoyed worldwide esteem. Published weekly from 1936 to 1972, the work of the photographers of LIFE magazine came to define the medium of photojournalism, and their photographs recorded history and informed us all for most of the 20th Century

    LIFE published an astonishing number of the most memorable photographs ever made, and the exhibition features many of these photographs from defining moments of the 20th century. The exhibition of more than 50 photographs includes iconic images such as Alfred Eisenstaedt's sailor kissing a nurse on VJ Day; powerful photographs from the 1960’s and the Civil Rights movement; memorable images of Sophia Loren, Marilyn Monroe, the Beatles and many more indelible photographs.
     

  • 1968: It Was Fifty Years Ago Today

    The year 1968 marked many changes for the United States. It signaled the end of the Kennedy-Johnson presidencies, the pinnacle of the civil rights movement, the beginning of Women's rights and Gay rights, and the beginning of the end of the war in Vietnam. More than that, it meant a change in public attitudes and beliefs. Photojournalism had a dominating role in the shaping of public attitudes at the time. Now, the exhibition comes amid a time of heightened awareness from political, racial, and social tensions.

    The year started with the Viet Cong opening the Tet Offensive by attacking major cities of South Vietnam, a move that triggered President Lyndon B. Johnson's call for peace negotiations. Johnny Cash recorded "Live at Folsom Prison", Eddie Adams photographs a Viet Cong officer as he is executed by Nguyen Ngoc Loan, a South Vietnamese National Police Chief. This photograph made headlines around the world, eventually winning the 1969 Pulitzer Prize, and sways U.S. public opinion against the war. On March 16, the Mai Lai massacre further shocks the nation, and on March 31st, President Lyndon B. Johnson surprised the nation by choosing not to run for reelection. On April 4th, civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr. was shot and killed in Memphis, Tennessee, leading to riots in Washington, D.C. and other cities. In late April, student protesters at Columbia University in New York City take over administration buildings and shut down the university, only one of many college protests that would unfold across the county.

  • Life In Winter

    Monroe Gallery of Photography is pleased to announce “Life In Winter,” an imaginative survey of inspiring images that reveal moments in history and the unseen and unexpected layers of our world in winter. The exhibition opens with a reception on Friday, November 25, from 5 to 7 PM. “Life In Winter” will continue through January 21, 2018.

    Additionally, “ART SHAY: A TRIBUTE” has been extended through January 21, 2018. This major exhibition of photographs from one of America’s most accomplished photographer’s celebrates Art Shay’s Lucie statue for Lifetime Achievement which he received during the Lucie Awards gala ceremony at Carnegie Hall in New York October 29, 2017. The Lucie Awards is the premiere annual event honoring the greatest achievements in photography.

    Concurrently, the Gallery is presenting “Tony Vaccaro At 95,” a special exhibition of photographs by Tony Vaccaro on the occasion of his 95th birthday. Tony Vaccaro played two risky roles, serving as a combat infantryman on the front lines, as well as a photographer who shot 8,000 photographs. Returning to the States in 1950, Tony started his career as a commercial photographer, eventually working for virtually every major publication: Flair, Look, Life, Venture, Harper’s Bazaar, Town and Country, Quick, Newsweek, and many more. Tony went on to become one the most sought after photographers of his day. Tony Vaccaro turns 95 on December 20, 2017.

  • Art Shay

    For over 70 years, Art Shay has documented life, combining his gifts of storytelling, humor and empathy. Art Shay will be honored with the Lucie statue for Lifetime Achievement during the Lucie Awards gala ceremony at Carnegie Hall in New York October 29, 2017.The Lucie Awards is the premiere annual event honoring the greatest achievements in photography

    Art Shay was born in the Bronx, New York, in 1922. During World War II, he was lead navigator on 30 missions in the Eighth Air Force. His service, which also includes 23 combat supplies missions, earned him five Air Medals, the Distinguished Flying Cross and the French Croix de Guerre. He is credited with shooting down one Focke Wulf 190, a German fighter plane.

  • Tony Vaccaro

    In 2016 HBO Films premiered "Under Fire: The Untold Story of Private First Class Tony Vaccaro". The film tells the story of how Tony survived the war, fighting the enemy while also documenting his experience at great risk, developing his photos in combat helmets at night and hanging the negatives from tree branches. The film also encompasses a wide range of contemporary issues regarding combat photography such as the ethical challenges of witnessing and recording conflict, the ways in which combat photography helps to define how wars are perceived by the public, and the sheer difficulty of staying alive while taking photos in a war zone.

  • Grit and Red Wine

    “Grit and Red Wine” is a special exhibition of photographs by Tony Vaccaro, currently 97, which includes many new discoveries from his vast archive. Tony Vaccaro is one of the few people alive who can claim to have survived the Battle of Normandy and COVID-19. July 3 through September 13, 2020.

  • Grey Villet

    Born in South Africa, Grey Villet traveled America and the world for LIFE magazine like an observant explorer, mapping its emotional contours in the faces and lives of its people. His in-depth, personal studies of the American scene of the 1950s through the 1970’s illuminated the complex reality of those years with a truth that, in his own words, were "as real as real could get." His images of presidents and revolutionaries, sports heroes, and everyday people struggling for their rights tell an emotional and compelling story of an era that shaped the present.

  • Steve Schapiro

    Eyewitness is an extensive exhibition of photographs from key moments in the Civil Rights movement by one of the most respected American documentary photographers, Steve Schapiro, February 10 – April 23, 2016.

  • Art Shay

    A major exhibition of photographs from one of America’s most accomplished photographers, Art Shay, November 25 through January 22, 2017.

    For over 70 years, Art Shay has documented life, combining his gifts of storytelling, humor and empathy. Born in 1922, he grew up in the Bronx and then served as a navigator in the U.S. Army Air Forces in World War II, during which he flew 52 bomber missions and a series of pictures he took of a collision between two B-24s above his air base in East Anglia was published in Look magazine. Shay joined the staff of Life magazine as a writer, and quickly became a Chicago-based freelance photographer for Life, Time, Sports Illustrated and other national publications. He has photographed nine US Presidents and many major figures of the 20th century. 

  • History In A Moment

    A major exhibition of iconic moments in history as captured by the leading photojournalists of the time. September 30 - November 20, 2016.

    "History In A Moment" mines the depth and breadth of Monroe Gallery's archives and is combined with new, never-before exhibited photojournalism masterpieces, from the early 1900's to the present day. The photographs in this exhibition are as much a history of American photojournalism as they are a history of the changing face of the latter part of the Twentieth Century. Through the images captured in these photographs, the eyes of a nation were opened as never before to a changing world.

    Historic images featured in the exhibition include the Wright Brothers’ first flight, scenes of migrant workers in the 1930’s and the Great Depression, searing war and conflict photography from World War II, Vietnam, 9/11, and the Iraq War. Historic political campaigns are represented, as are key moments in the civil rights struggle from the 1050’s to the present day.

  • The American Family Album

    A selection of 50 photographs that represents a collective American Family Album: an offbeat and absorbing portrait of the American experience. Unusual, timeless, irrational; these anonymous memories of America are not what we expect. The images are an elusive vision of a country without limits and challenge us to reinterpret the impact, value, and status of photographs we encounter in our daily lives. There may be no Pulitzer Prize-winning pictures in the exhibition, but the photographs are nonetheless glorious in their innocence.

  • Alfred Eisenstaedt

    Santa Fe--Monroe Gallery of Photography, 112 Don Gaspar, is pleased to announce a major exhibition of classic and seldom-seen photographs by Alfred Eisenstaedt. The exhibition opens on Friday, April 29, and will continue through June 26.

  • Vintage Photojournalism

    Santa Fe--Monroe Gallery of Photography, 112 Don Gaspar, is pleased to announce: “Vintage Photojournalism”, a major exhibition of rare vintage prints from the 20th Century’s master photojournalists. The exhibition opens with a public reception on Friday, February 19, 5 – 7 pm, and continues through April 17.

  • They Broke The Mold

    An extensive exhibition of classic photographs of ground-breaking and important singers and entertainers, coinciding with the publication of the new book “Sinatra: The Photographs” by Andy Howick. Signed copies of the new book are available from the gallery.An extensive exhibition of classic photographs of ground-breaking and important singers and entertainers, coinciding with the publication of the new book “Sinatra: The Photographs” by Andy Howick. Signed copies of the new book are available from the gallery.

  • WHEN WE WERE YOUNG

    Santa Fe — Monroe Gallery of Photography, 112 Don Gaspar, is pleased to announce: "When We were Young," an exhibition exploring childhood years as documented by over 25 leading photojournalists throughout the 20th Century. The exhibition opens with a public reception on July 8, 2005, from 5 - 8 PM. The exhibition opening coincides with Photo Arts Santa Fe, a biennial ten day summer festival celebrating and showcasing the photographic arts. The exhibition will continue through October 2.

    Through more than 55 photographs, this major exhibition explores the joys, vulnerabilities, lost innocence and indomitable resilience of childhood years throughout the 20th Century, as captured by over 25 leading photojournalists. Photographs in the exhibition are certain to evoke memories in the viewer: some are personal, tied to experiences in our own lives; others are collective, shared memories of key events in our time.

  • Stephen Wilkes

    Santa Fe--Monroe Gallery of Photography, 112 Don Gaspar, is pleased to present "Remnants", an exhibition of large-scale color photographs (up to 50 x 80 inches) of the environment and the environmental remnants left behind either by nature or man.

    The exhibition opens with a public reception with photographer Stephen Wilkes from 5 - 7 PM on Friday, October 2. The exhibition continues through November 22.

  • The Long Road

    The exhibition comes at a time of heightened awareness, not only from the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King's march and the acclaimed film "Selma" but also as Baltimore and Ferguson, Missouri, and other American cities grapple with conflicts across the racial divide. The exhibition features iconic photographs from the historic 1965 march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama alongside images from many other important keystones of the civil rights movement, including recent protests in New York and Ferguson, Missouri.

  • Margaret Bourke-White

    Santa Fe--Monroe Gallery of Photography is pleased to announce the exhibition “MARGARET BOURKE-WHITE: Pioneering Photojournalist”. The exhibition opens with a public reception Friday, April 24, from 5 - 7 PM, and continues through June 28.

    Margaret Bourke-White was a pioneering figure in 20th century documentary photography. As a founding mother of LIFE (she photographed the first cover), she became a world-famous symbol of globe-trotting photojournalism. And that she did it in a male world made her success even more spectacular. As an artist, Bourke-White continued to use photography as an instrument to examine social issues from a humanitarian perspective. She witnessed and documented some of the 20th century’s most notable moments, including the liberation of German concentration camps by General Patton in 1945, the release of Mahatma Gandhi from prison in 1946, and the effects of South African labor exploitation in the 1950s. Her career was cut short in 1966 due to Parkinson’s disease, and she died in 1971.

  • Andreas Feininger

    Monroe Gallery of Photography is pleased to announce an exhibition of photographs by by Andreas Feininger. The exhibition opens Friday, February 13 and continues through April 5.

    Feininger’s pictures of New York in the 1940s and ’50s helped define, for all time, not merely how a great 20th century city looked, but how it imagined itself and its place in the world. With its traffic-jammed streets, gritty waterfronts, iconic bridges and inimitable skyline, the city assumed the character of a vast, vibrant landscape. Featured in the exhibition are many of Feininger's most iconic New York cityscapes, as well as many other.

  • Life Magazine

    Monroe Gallery of Photography, 112 Don Gaspar, is pleased to announce its inaugural exhibition, LIFE MAGAZINE: MASTER PHOTOJOURNALISTS. The exhibition opens on April 19, and will continue through June 30.

    From the tumult of battle to the glamour of movie stars, from the wonders of nature to the coronation of kings, queens, and presidents, the work of LIFE magazine photographers is as much a history of American photojournalism as it is a history of the changing face of the latter part of the Twentieth Century. Photojournalism was introduced to America with the advent of LIFE magazine in 1936, resulting in a revolution in storytelling and news. On the pages of LIFE, through the images captured by these masters, the eyes of a nation were opened as never before to a changing world.
     

  • LOVE/KISS

    SANTA FE — Monroe Gallery of Photography, 112 Don Gaspar, is pleased to announce "LOVE/KISS," a major group exhibition of compelling and provocative photographs exploring themes of love, romance, passion, and devotion.

    The exhibition opens with a public reception on Friday, January 16, 2004, from 5 to 7. A special reception will also be held on Friday, February 20, in celebration of ART FEAST. For this annual charitable event benefiting art in Santa Fe schools, Monroe Gallery has partnered with the renowned El Farol restaurant to create "LOVE/KISS: Aphrodisiac Tapas" (tickets required). "LOVE/KISS" will continue through March 28.

  • FORGOTTEN ELLIS ISLAND

    Santa Fe — Monroe Gallery of Photography, 112 Don Gaspar, is pleased to present "Forgotten Ellis Island," an exhibition featuring the documentary project of leading contemporary photographer Stephen Wilkes. The exhibition opens with a public reception for the photographer on Friday, October 1, from 5 - 7 PM. The exhibition continues through November 21.

    "Forgotten Ellis Island" is a collection of large format color cibachrome photographs of the abandoned buildings on the southern side of Ellis Island. Photographed in 1998, "Forgotten Ellis Island" is visual history of the benign neglect of the medical facilities and dormitories of the historic immigration center, which at that time had not yet been restored. Wilkes' photographs capture the haunting beauty of this century old building. Using natural light, Wilkes painstakingly photographed the peeling paint, rusted iron, broken glass and halls with wind-strewn leaves and created an ethereal diorama that is captivating and compelling. Brilliant sunsets on the water outside these buildings shed spectral light that is both alluring and eerie. "Forgotten Ellis Island" is a rich visual tapestry evoking the ghosts of the millions of immigrants who passed through these halls on their first stop in America. With his exclusive photographs and video work Wilkes was able to help secure $6,000,000 to renovate this once exquisite ruin. Today all that remains of the past are Wilkes' haunting photographs.

  • HOLLYWOOD, USA

    Monroe Gallery of Photography, 112 Don Gaspar, is pleased to announce:"Hollywood, USA", an exhibition exploring the fascination and impact of the enigma that is "Hollywood". The exhibition opens with a public reception on February 4, 2005. The exhibition will continue through April 3.

    In 1911, Hollywood's first film studio opened. Three years later, Cecil B. DeMille, Jesse Lasky and Samuel Goldwyn took a giant cinematic step with the release of the first feature-length film, and the American dream burst out bigger than life, ultimately touching everyone, everywhere. The industry that transformed this relatively barren place into a land as mystical and intoxicating as Xanadu was the motion picture business. What we think of as Hollywood quickly became much too colossal to be contained within a section of the City of Angels. It spread across the nation and around the world. Hollywood taught girls and boys, gangsters and everyday people, how to walk and talk and dress. It rescued us from the rigors of the Depression and assured us that we could topple our savage foes in battle. It gave us music and dancing, violence and sex. Movies would always be about laughing and crying, about learning how to live and how to die. Nowhere and nothing else frees our fantasies and stirs our hopes and fears, our tears and our eternal romances, like that single incomparable word - Hollywood.

  • AMERICA THE BEAUTIFUL

    Monroe Gallery of Photography is pleased to announce "AMERICA THE BEAUTIFUL", a major group exhibition of compelling and provocative photographs illustrating America, American life, and the American people. The exhibition opens July 4. "AMERICA THE BEAUTIFUL" will continue through September 22.

    Through more than 50 enthralling images, "AMERICA THE BEAUTIFUL" explores the rituals, celebrations, social change, history, and memories of the American nation. Photographs in the exhibit depict major events and everyday life; themes of patriotism, memory, conflict, and identity; and explore the complex and changing relationship between Americans and their homeland. Images in the exhibit will recall memorable events: some are personal, tied to experiences in our own lives. Others are collective, shared memories of key events in our nation's past.

     

  • LIFE/STYLE

    Santa Fe, Monroe Gallery of Photography, 112 Don Gaspar, is pleased to announce "LIFE/STYLE", an exhibition celebrating the 70th anniversary LIFE magazine and the publication of the new book "LIFE: 70 Years of Extraordinary Photography: Platinum Anniversary Collection". The exhibition opens with a public reception on Friday, January 12, 200, from 5 - 7 PM, and will continue through March 31.

    For much of the past century, LIFE magazine has captured the major events of history with photographs that have remained ingrained in our consciousness. From the tumult of battle to the glamour of movie stars, from the wonders of nature to the coronation of kings, queens, and presidents, the work of LIFE magazine photographers is as much a history of American photojournalism as it is a history of the changing face of the latter part of the twentieth century.

  • SPEAK TRUTH TO POWER

    Santa Fe-Monroe Gallery of Photography, 112 Don Gaspar, is honored to announce an important exhibition,"Speak Truth To Power". The exhibition of more than 50 compelling photographs illustrates the belief that every individual possesses the power to cause positive change - that a photograph really can "change the world". The exhibit opens Friday, July 6, from 5 - 7 PM and will continue through September 23.

    Exhibition illustrates the power of photography to inform, persuade, enlighten and enrich the viewer's life.

    This ambitious exhibition presents photographs that have caused us, as observers, to re-examine our pre-conceived notions and readjust our perspective of the world we inhabit. The photographs document the courage of leading rights defenders and other lesser known and everyday people who have been championing rights and who walk among us in every country of the world. Also included are several major events as chronicled by photojournalists that galvanized society to effect change.

  • FOR LOVE OF THE GAME

    Santa Fe--Monroe Gallery of Photography, 112 Don Gaspar, is pleased to announce "For Love Of The Game" an extensive survey of more than 50 classic photographs portraying iconic events and personalities from world of sports as captured by renowned photographers. The exhibition opens with a reception on Friday, November 23, from 5 to 7 PM. "For Love Of The Game" will continue through January 27, 2008.
     

    Exhibition of more than 50 compelling photographs documents the "golden era" of sports and takes a nostalgic look back to the heroes of the time.
     

  • MAKING MOVIES

    Santa Fe--Monroe Gallery of Photography, 112 Don Gaspar, is pleased to announce: "MAKING MOVIES", an exhibition of photographs from the sets of classic films from the 20th Century. The exhibition opens with a public reception on Friday, February 1, 2008, from 5 - 7 PM, with photographer Brian Hamill in attendance.

    On the set of every movie is a still photographer, documenting the movie's action (often alongside the camera) to be used in publicizing it. They provide the images for posters, photographs in newspapers and magazines, and other media. Over time, photographs from classic movies have developed historical and cultural importance.

     

  • THE CITY OF NEW YORK

    Santa Fe--Monroe Gallery of Photography, 112 Don Gaspar, is pleased to announce the exhibition "The City Of New York", an extensive survey of more than 60 classic photographs portraying the iconic city as captured by renowned photographers. The exhibition opens with a public reception on Friday, February 6, from 5 to 7 PM. "The City Of New York" will continue through April 19.

    The City of New York, most often called New York City, is the most populous city in the United States, in a metropolitan area that ranks among the world's most-populous urban areas. It is a leading global city, exerting a powerful influence over worldwide commerce, finance, culture, and entertainment.

     

  • A Thousand Words

    Santa Fe - Monroe Gallery of Photography, 112 Don Gaspar, is pleased to announce "A Thousand Words: Masters of Photojournalism", an exhibition of more than 60 great photographs from the field of photojournalism. The exhibition opens with a public reception on July 3 from 5 - 7 pm, and will continue through September 25.

    The phrase "A picture is worth a thousand words" emerged in the early part of the 20th century, and is said to have been derived from a faulty translation of a Chinese proverb. However, the way a photograph can capture time, emotions, and feelings has made photography a unique art form. There are certain mysteries about great photographs that captivate viewers and cause us to pause in thought and remembrance. We have often seen these photographs reproduced numerous times in newspapers, magazines, books and documentaries. Universally relevant, they reflect the past, the present, and the changing times. These unforgettable images are imbedded in our collective consciousness; they are defining moments chronicling our visual history. They are, indeed, worth a thousand words.

  • ON THE TOWN

    Santa Fe - Monroe Gallery of Photography, 112 Don Gaspar, is pleased to announce "On The Town", an extensive survey of more than 50 classic photographs depicting the celebrations of life as captured by renowned photographers. The exhibition opens with a reception on Friday, November 27, from 5 to 7 PM. "On The Town" will continue through January 31, 2010.

    Just in time for the holidays, the exhibition portrays social rituals and people having fun at public places like bars, restaurants, and theaters. "On the town" is probably derived from the old English saying "going to town": "to arrive or make one's mark where significant things are happening". The American adaptation "on the town" came to mean "in spirited pursuit of the entertainment offered by a town or city", probably dating from the 19th century when going to town for an outing or a spree was a big day for country folk.

    The subject has provided rich material for photographers for decades: magnificent environments, beautiful and exquisite women and handsome and poised men celebrating with exuberance and gusto. Also pictured are some of the simpler pursuits of entertainment, such as when the drive-in theater and drive-in restaurant were novel and luxurious attractions.

    Going "on the town" has been a pastime for generations, when times are good and when times are tough, people want to be happy. Monroe Gallery of Photography invites you to join the festivities!

     

  • THE ART OF SOUND

    Santa Fe--Monroe Gallery of Photography, 112 Don Gaspar, is pleased to announce "The Art of Sound", an extensive survey of more than 50 classic photographs portraying iconic personalities from the field of music as captured by renowned photographers. All genres of music are represented, including opera, pop, jazz, classical, and rock. The exhibition opens with a reception on Friday, February 5, from 5 to 7 PM. "The Art of Sound" will continue through April 11.

  • Composing The Artist

    Monroe Gallery of Photography, 112 Don Gaspar, is pleased to announce "Composing The Artist", an extensive survey of more than 50 classic photographs portraying iconic personalities from the arts as captured by renowned photographers. The exhibition opens with a reception on Friday, May 6, from 5 to 7 PM. "Composing The Artist" will continue through June 26.

    The common definition of an "artist" is one who is able, by virtue of imagination and talent or skill, to create works of aesthetic value, especially in the fine arts. Photographs of artists and writers across the centuries have shaped our sense of what they do. Photographs in the exhibit include images of visual artists and classic writers, at work, in quiet contemplative moments and in portraiture. In these photographs the essential personality of the artist is revealed, and an image of the past becomes visual history. Other pictures also brilliantly match artworks with the personality and appearance of their creators: they are not just at one with their working environment, they are their work.

  • VIVIAN MAIER

    If the name Vivian Maier is unfamiliar to you, that's because the prolific street photographer was essentially unknown throughout her lifetime. With a camera around her neck whenever she left the house, she would obsessively take pictures, but never showed her photos to anyone. An unabashed and unapologetic original. Now, Maier is posthumously being recognized as one of the greatest American street photographers of the 20th Century. The recent discovery of Maier's pictures has resounded through the photography world and her story has been sweeping the international press. Please join us to view this remarkable discovery.

  • PEOPLE GET READY

    Monroe Gallery of Photography, 112 Don Gaspar, is pleased to present "People Get Ready", a major exhibition of 55 dramatic photographs from significant human rights struggles in history. The exhibition opens with a public reception Friday, July 6, 5 - 7 PM, and continues through September 23.

    The belief that everyone, by virtue of her or his humanity, is entitled to certain human rights is fairly new. Its roots, however, lie in earlier traditions and documents of many cultures; however, it took the catalyst of World War II to propel human rights onto the global stage and into the global conscience.

  • Mark Shaw

    Monroe Gallery of Photography, is pleased to announce a major exhibition of photographs by Mark Shaw, concurrent with the publication of the new book "The Kennedys". The exhibition opens on Friday, November 23, and will continue through January 27, 2013.

    This stunning new publication is the definitive collection of Mark Shaw's renowned photographs of the Kennedys. Most of the photographs featured in the book and exhibition have never been seen before. Shaw first photographed the Kennedys in 1959 for Life magazine. He subsequently developed a close friendship with the family that gave him extraordinary and informal access to their inner circle. During the following four years, Shaw captured them at their most relaxed: in Nantucket, Hyannis Port, Jacqueline's family home in Merrywood, Virginia and on The Amalfi Coast with the Agnellis. On the campaign trail in West Virginia, pre-White House at their first proper family home in Georgetown and at the star-studded inauguration gala. He became the Kennedys' unofficial family photographer and his captivating shots capture some of their most intimate and candid moments. Among the most memorable photographs must be the image that was JFK's personal favorite; the photograph he told his family and friends he liked best. Perhaps somewhat poignantly, as the 50th anniversary of the assassination approaches, it is the image of Kennedy walking alone in the sand dunes at Hyannis Port which resonates, alongside a later iconic and moving image of the rider-less horse and the fallen leader's reversed riding boots.

  • SHAKE, RATTLE, AND ROLL

    Santa Fe--Monroe Gallery of Photography, 112 Don Gaspar, is pleased to announce "SHAKE, RATTLE, AND ROLL": Photographs That Rock!, an exhibition of great photographs from the history of rock and roll music. The exhibition opens with a reception with several photographers present on Friday, January 17, from 5 to 7 PM. A special reception will also be held on Friday, February 21, in celebration of ART FEAST. "SHAKE, RATTLE, AND ROLL" will continue through March 2, 2003.

    Rock and Roll has been a major force since 1954. The story of Rock and Roll is also the story of American popular music: a musical evolution from blues, rhythm, and jazz. Photographers were on the scene to document the exciting and often controversial performers, first for newspapers and magazines; and eventually an entire industry was created in response to the record companies' need for constant material for publicity and album promotion. Included in the exhibition are spontaneous concert images, impromptu images from dark back rooms and nightclubs, and meticulously composed studio sessions.

     

  • 1963

    1963 was a year of change: change in leadership and social change. 1963 ran the gamut of human emotion and human endeavor. It was a year that began with high hopes for easing of international tensions, a year that sustained a terrible period of shock and mourning and ended with a nation and a world community coming to understand a new maturity in its ability to cope with sudden and enormously difficult circumstances.

    An afternoon at a lunch counter. A thousand arms linked at the elbows. A firing line of water hoses. A pack of German Shepherds. A letter from a Birmingham Jail, A devastating explosion, The Dodgers win the works series. Beatlemania begins. John F. Kennedy is assassinated. A world that would never be the same.

     

  • Ernest Withers

    Santa Fe--Monroe Gallery of Photography, 112 Don Gaspar, is pleased to present "Ernest Withers: A Life's Work". The exhibition opens with a public reception on Friday, October 4, from 5 - 7 PM with very special guest Rosalind Withers, Ernest's daughter and President/Board Chairman of the Withers Collection Trust. The exhibition continues through November 24, 2013.

    Ernest C. Withers was, in his own words, 'a news photographer', 'recording events that were taking place.' Momentous events were occurring and he recorded them for newspapers and magazines across the country, covering dramatic civil rights stories, Memphis as the epicenter of the musical life of the nation, and the plethora of outstanding African American players that gave rise to Negro League baseball. His life's work is an encompassing and moving chronicle of the great American crusade of the second half of the Twentieth Century.

     

  • When Cool Was King

    Santa Fe — Monroe Gallery of Photography, 112 Don Gaspar, is pleased to present "When Cool Was King," a major exhibition featuring photographs from a time when cool reigned supreme. The exhibition opens with a public reception on Friday, February 14, from 5 - 7, and continues through April 20.

    Neat-o, awesome, swell, that's a gas. The phrase "cool" never goes out of style. In their book "COOL: An Anatomy of an Attitude," Dick Pountain and David Robins ask "So what exactly is Cool? That is a difficult question to answer. Is it a philosophy, a sensibility, a religion, an ideology, a personality type, a behavior pattern, an attitude, a worldview?" The exhibition does not attempt to answer that question, but simply accepts Cool as a phenomenon that we can recognize when we see it.

  • Masters of French Photography

    Masters of French Photography: Jacques Henri Lartigue, Edouard Boubat, Robert Doisneau, Willy Ronis

    Monroe Gallery of Photography, 112 Don Gaspar, Santa Fe, is pleased to announce "Masters of French Photography: Jacques Henri Lartigue, Edouard Boubat, Robert Doisneau, Willy Ronis." The exhibit opens with a reception Friday, March 7, and continues through April 13. Through the work of these four important photographers, almost a full century is documented. Regrettably, three of these masters are no longer with us, and Willy Ronis is now 93. The exhibition highlights La Belle Epoque, the Occupation and Liberation of Paris, day by day photojournalism; and illustrates perfectly the French "joie de vivre."

     

  • The Long Road

    July 3 through September 27, 2015

    The exhibition comes at a time of heightened awareness, not only from the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King's march and the acclaimed film "Selma" but also as Baltimore and Ferguson, Missouri, and other American cities grapple with conflicts across the racial divide. The exhibition features iconic photographs from the historic 1965 march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama alongside images from many other important keystones of the civil rights movement, including recent protests in New York and Ferguson, Missouri.

  • THEY BROKE THE MOLD

    Friday, November 27 through January 30, 2016.
    An extensive exhibition of classic photographs of ground-breaking and important singers and entertainers, coinciding with the publication of the new book “Sinatra: The Photographs” by Andy Howick. Signed copies of the new book are available from the gallery.

    Few stars in any medium have had an impact on our visual culture like Frank Sinatra, whose centennial falls on December 12, 2015. Frank Sinatra was one of the most popular and influential musical artists of the 20th century and characterizes the definition of “groundbreaking”. Many genres of music are represented in the exhibition, including opera, pop, jazz, classical, and rock.

  • THE AMERICAN FAMILY ALBUM

    Wanderlust and encounters of the American family in pictures.

    July 1 through September 18, 2016

    A selection of 50 photographs that represents a collective American Family Album: an offbeat and absorbing portrait of the American experience. Unusual, timeless, irrational; these anonymous memories of America are not what we expect. The images are an elusive vision of a country without limits and challenge us to reinterpret the impact, value, and status of photographs we encounter in our daily lives. There may be no Pulitzer Prize-winning pictures in the exhibition, but the photographs are nonetheless glorious in their innocence.

  • THE BOLD AND THE BEAUTIFUL

    THE BOLD AND THE BEAUTIFUL: 50 ENTHRALLING IMAGES

    SANTA FE — Monroe Gallery of Photography, 112 Gaspar, is pleased to announce "The Bold and the Beautiful," a major group exhibition of compelling and provocative photographs depicting brave, courageous, intrepid, and audacious people and personalities. The exhibition opens with a public reception on Friday, July 11, from 5 to 8, coinciding with PhotoArts Santa Fe, a ten day summer festival celebrating and showcasing the photographic carts. "The Bold and the Beautiful" will continue through September 14.
     

  • NEIL LEIFER

    SANTA FE — We are pleased to host Neil Leifer for his second major exhibition at Monroe Gallery of Photography. The exhibition celebrates the release of the new book "Neil Leifer: Portraits." Neil Leifer will be present for the opening reception on Friday, September 19, 5 - 8 PM, and the exhibition continues through November 23.

    "Neil Leifer: Portraits" is a stunning collection of 100 photographs, and is published by St. Ann's Press, a publishing company dedicated to producing fine art books specializing in photography. The book features an introduction by Tom Brokow. Monroe Gallery of Photography will be the first venue to have this book available; a national release and book tour follows. Signed books are available from the gallery.

     

  • THE ARTS

    Santa Fe — Monroe Gallery of Photography, 112 Don Gaspar, is pleased to announce "The Arts", an extensive survey of more than 50 classic photographs portraying iconic personalities from the arts as captured by renowned photographers. The exhibition opens with a reception on Friday, February 3, from 5 to 7 PM. "The Arts" will continue through April 16.

    The common definition of an "artist" is one who is able, by virtue of imagination and talent or skill, to create works of aesthetic value, especially in the fine arts. Photographs in the exhibit include images of visual artists, classic writers, composers, and performers, at work and in performance; in quiet contemplative moments and in portraiture. In these photographs the essential personality of the artist is revealed, and an image of the past becomes visual history. Also included are fascinating interior and exterior photographs of great venues, such as the Metropolitan Opera, La Scala Opera House, The Louvre and The Guggenheim.


     

  • ELLIS ISLAND

    Santa Fe--Monroe Gallery of Photography, 112 Don Gaspar, is pleased to present "Ellis Island: Ghosts of Freedom", an important exhibition featuring the documentary project of leading contemporary photographer Stephen Wilkes and celebrating the publication by W. W. Norton of a major new book of the same title.

    "Wilkes' photographs of the 'dark side' of Ellis Island are extraordinary - this book will be a major event." David McCullough.

     

  • THE GREAT LIFE PHOTOGRAPHERS

    Santa Fe — Monroe Gallery of Photography, 112 Don Gaspar, is pleased to announce "THE GREAT LIFE PHOTOGRAPHERS", an exhibition celebrating the rebirth of LIFE magazine and the publication of a new book of the same title. The exhibition opens with a public reception on November 26, and will continue through January 30, 2005.

    From the tumult of battle to the glamour of movie stars, from the wonders of nature to the coronation of kings, queens, and presidents, the work of LIFE magazine photographers is as much a history of American photojournalism as it is a history of the changing face of the latter part of the twentieth century. Photojournalism was introduced to America with the advent of LIFE magazine in 1936, and through the end of the twentieth century these photographers traveled the globe to chronicle in pictures every aspect of the human condition. On the pages of LIFE, through the images captured by these masters, the eyes of a nation were opened as never before to a changing world.